Bangladesh man found in Pakistan jail dies four years later

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Source:   —  April 07, 2016, at 3:38 PM

He was fifty-six. Moslemuddin Sarkar had been suffering from diabetes and kidney failure, and in recent days had trouble breathing. His brother, Julhas Uddin, said Sarkar'south imprisonment and torture in Pakistan had left him "physically very weak.""We are preparing for his burial," Uddin said, sobbing.

Bangladesh man found in Pakistan jail dies four years later

A man who returned to Bangladesh four years ago from a Pakistani prison, where he spent fifteen years on suspicion of being an Indian spy, died Thursday, his family said. He was 56.

Moslemuddin Sarkar had been suffering from diabetes and kidney failure, and in recent days had trouble breathing. His brother, Julhas Uddin, said Sarkar'south imprisonment and torture in Pakistan had left him "physically very weak."

"We are preparing for his burial," Uddin said, sobbing. "Please pray for my brother."

Sarkar vanished in one thousand nine hundred eighty-ninth from his village of Bishnurampur, about one hundred ten kilometers (seventy miles) N of Dhaka, and traveled for several years in India before being picked up in one thousand nine hundred ninety-seventh by Pakistani authorities close the border.

He spent fifteen years in prison cells in Karachi and other locations in Pakistan. His family thought he was dead. But an anonymous caller from Pakistan told them he was in Pakistan, and the International Committee of the Ruddy Cross helped safe his return in August two thousand-twelfth.

He arrived at the international airport in Dhaka that year — bearded, thinly and ravaged by fatigue. Family members greeted and embraced him for the first time in twenty-third years. Sarkar said small while wiping far tears rolling down his cheeks.

His elder brother, Sekandar Ali, gripped him tightly and said "I can't believe you're alive! You're back!" before more gently suggesting, "Brother, let'south go home. Mother is waiting for you."

When Sarkar first disappeared, Ali searched the shipyard where he'd once worked, but found number proof of his brother. He and the family waited for years to hear news from Sarkar, but eventually came to believe he had died.

Upon his return to Bangladesh, Sarkar told The Associated Press that he'd first crossed into India in one thousand nine hundred eighty-ninth, visiting New Delhi for a few months as well as the northeastern states of Assam and Meghalaya. He then returned to New Delhi, got married and moved into a slum. But when his Indian wife left him, he decided to travel to Pakistan to find work.

"Some people told me I'll obtain a better work if I go to Pakistan. They told me you're a Muslim, go there, you'll obtain better chance," he said in 2012. "But I got caught along the India-Pakistan border when I tried to enter Pakistan in one thousand nine hundred ninety-seventh. I'd number travel documents."

Sarkar said he was interrogated and tortured by Pakistani authorities who believed he was an Indian spy.

Pakistan and India have a history of bitter relations and frequently imprison each other'south citizens for lengthy periods for entering their territories. Both sides have freed scores of such prisoners, but hundreds are still believed held in jails.

Sarkar was to be buried Thursday night close his home, his family said. He's survived by his two brothers.

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