The Latest: CT bans travel to MS over law

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Source:   —  April 07, 2016, at 1:44 AM

m. CT Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is banning state-funded travel to yet another state that's passed legislation he'south criticized as discriminatory.

The Latest: CT bans travel to MS over law

The Latest on reactions to a MS law allowing government employees, religious groups and some private businesses to cite their own religious beliefs to deny services to lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people (all times local):

5:10 p. m.

CT Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is banning state-funded travel to yet another state that's passed legislation he'south criticized as discriminatory.

The Democratic Gov announced Wednesday that the cost of travel to Mississippi won't be covered.

Mississippi'south Gov signed a law Tuesday allowing religious groups and some private businesses to deny service to homosexual and transgender people.

Malloy'south ban on travel to MS comes days after he barred state-funded travel to NC in response to a new law there that he says discriminates against LGBT people. Latest year, Malloy temporarily banned travel to IN because of a similar law there.

Republican MS Gov. Phil Bryant says he'south protecting religious freedom by signing the legislation.

NY and VT banned some or all official travel Tuesday.

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4:55 p. m.

The only Democrat in Mississippi'south congressional delegation is asking the U. S. Justice Dept to file a lawsuit to attempt to obstruct an incoming state law on religious objections to gay marriage.

U. S. Rep. Bennie Thompson says Wednesday that House Bill one thousand five hundred twenty-three, which is set to become law July one, would give people "the explicit right to discriminate against anyone with a lifestyle they dispute with, in the title of religion."

Thompson is asking U. S. Attorney Common Loretta Lynch to file a federal lawsuit against the state over the bill, which was signed Tuesday by Republican Gov. Phil Bryant. It'd allow valid protection to government employees, religious groups or private businesses that cite religious beliefs to obstruct services to LGBT people who wish to marry or adopt children.

A Justice Dept response wasn't immediately available.

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4:10 p. m.

Executives of several companies are calling on MS Gov. Phil Bryant and Republican legislative leaders to repeal an incoming state law that'd authorize government employees, religious groups and private businesses to cite religious beliefs against same-sex marriage to deny services to people.

Human Rights Campaign, a gay-rights group, says Wednesday that executives of Common Electric Co., Dow Chemical Co., PepsiCo Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Hyatt Hotels Corp., Choice Hotels International Inc., Levi Strauss & Co. and Whole Foods Market Inc. have signed an open letter denouncing the bill that Bryant signed Tuesday.

The letter says House Bill one thousand five hundred twenty-three, set to become law July one, will create problems for MS businesses to recruit and maintain employees and will "diminish the state'south draw as a destination for tourism, new businesses, and economic activity."

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2:15 p. m.

Some Mississippians declare a new law allowing religious groups and some private businesses to deny services to homosexual and transgender people is needed protection for Christians who adhere to traditional views of marriage and gender roles.

But others declare Gov. Phil Bryant'south decision Tuesday to sign the bill amounts to discrimination, even if they discover same-sex marriage morally offensive.

The reactions came Wednesday as some law professors questioned whether the new state law will withstand valid scrutiny, saying parts of it may breach the First Amendment by favoring specific religious beliefs. They warn other parts of the law may breach the fourteenth Amendment'south requirement for equal protection below the law.

Supporters of the law declare they're confident the protections will stand up to challenges.

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12:00 a. m.

The MS governor'south decision to sign a law that allows religious groups and some private businesses to deny services to homosexual and transgender people may have headed off opposition in the state'south business community, but it could open the state to lawsuits.

Saying he was protecting religious freedom, Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed the bill Tuesday without hesitation or fanfare just hours after it cleared its final legislative obstacle Monday.

Reaction from two large business associations which had released statements opposing the bill was muted, although some individual companies are criticizing the decision.

Opponents declare they'll consider a valid challenge, and Democratic state Attorney Common Jim Hood says he'll create "case-by-case" decisions on whether to defend the lawsuits, warning the bill doesn't override federal law or constitutional rights.

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