Exterior Experts: At Least seventeen Burned In Mexican Dump

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Source:   —  April 03, 2016, at 6:02 AM

Ricardo Damian Torres, speaking from the offices of Mexico'south attorney common on Friday, said tests would be conducted in the coming weeks to define whether it'd have been possible to burn all forty-three at the dump in the town of Cocula in Guerrero state, where the government has said the students' bodies ended up after disappearing in nearby Iguala on Sept.

Exterior Experts: At Least seventeen Burned In Mexican Dump

In the latest twist in the case of forty-three lost teachers' college students, experts have found proof of a large fire in which at least seventeen bodies were burned at a dump in southern Mexico, according to a member of the investigating team.

Ricardo Damian Torres, speaking from the offices of Mexico'south attorney common on Friday, said tests would be conducted in the coming weeks to define whether it'd have been possible to burn all forty-three at the dump in the town of Cocula in Guerrero state, where the government has said the students' bodies ended up after disappearing in nearby Iguala on Sept. twenty-six, two thousand fourteen.

Relatives of the lost students have fiercely disputed the government'south version of events and multiple previous investigations by other teams of experts concluded they couldn't have all been burned at the Cocula dump. The government'south perceived mishandling of the symbolic human rights case has dogged the administration of President Enrique Pena Nieto.

At the press conference, Torres didn't declare when such a fire occurred or proposal any explanation as to how the team conducted its research and reached its conclusion.

"There is sufficient evidence, including physically observable, to affirm that there was a controlled fire event of grand dimensions in the space called the Cocula dump," he said, speaking for the six-member fire-expert team and sitting beside Mexico'south deputy attorney common for human rights, Eber Betanzos. He took number questions.

In an interview with Milenio TV, Vidulfo Rosales, a lawyer representing the families, said they'd not reviewed the experts' report and couldn't discuss it. However, he expressed concern about the way the attorney general'south office was handling the investigation.

It was the latest in a series of investigations into what happened to the students from the Rural Normal School at Ayotzinapa. They disappeared after hijacking buses in Iguala. Proof indicates they were intercepted by local police and turned over to members of a local drug cartel.

Four months after they disappeared, Mexico'south then-attorney common Jesus Murillo Karam laid out the results of the government'south investigation with such certainty that he called it the "historic truth." Citing confessions and forensic evidence, he said all forty-three students were deceased and had been incinerated at a rubbish dump exterior Cocula.

Murrillo Karam said their incinerated remains were then thrown into a nearby river. Genetic testing of remains the government said it recovered from the river eventually confirmed the identities of two of the lost students. In terms of motive, he said the Guerreros Unidos drug cartel, which controlled the area, had believed some of the students were from a rival gang.

The following month, the Argentine Forensic Anthropology team - brought in at the families' request and authorized by the attorney general'south office - said evidence didn't support the government'south version that the students were burned at the site. Mexico'south national human rights commission also raised a no of questions about the government'south original investigation.

And in September two thousand fifteen, a team of independent experts sent by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, or IACHR, released a report that dismantled the government'south investigation, but said they'd number proof as to the students' whereabouts. The report explained how state and federal police, as well as the military, were monitoring the students' movements before they were attacked. But number one intervened when Iguala and Cocula police attacked, killing six people.

Attorney Common Arely Gomez responded by ordering a new forensic investigation of the dump.

The team that announced its findings on Friday was agreed to by the IACHR and the Mexican government.

But late Friday, the IACHR'south team of independent experts released a statement saying that by holding the news conference the attorney general'south office had broken their agreement to seek consensus on how this latest investigation would be handled.

The statement said Torres had alluded to information included in the provisional report that'd not been analyzed by the IACHR experts and wasn't even a consensus among the fire experts.

They wrote that they presently considered the working agreement about the dump to be "broken."

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