LinkedIn doubles down on Recruiter, its large income generator, with a major upgrade

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Source:   —  April 19, 2016, at 6:44 PM

So this week, ahead of its following quarterly earnings on April twenty-eight, LinkedIn is shoring up in areas where it’s either already strong or banking on growing more.

LinkedIn doubles down on Recruiter, its large income generator, with a major upgrade

LinkedIn — the social platform used by four hundred million professionals looking to network or discover work —  has taken a major summerset in the markets in the latest few months over feeble financial guidance amid slowing growth. So this week, ahead of its following quarterly earnings on April twenty-eight, LinkedIn is shoring up in areas where it’s either already strong or banking on growing more.

Today, LinkedIn launched a vastly overhauled new version of its Recruiter platform, the interface and paid product used by those who mine the company’s database to fill jobs, which makes up a large portion of Talent Solutions, LinkedIn’s biggest income stream. (The main product is sold on a license basis, with the average price starting at around $8.000 per user annually, the company tells me.)

The new version — first previewed in Oct latest year — includes a new interface and other enhancements, but maybe most notable is the fact that it'll presently feature bright look for and suggestions of similar candidates. As portion of LinkedIn’s artillery of services to woo more paying users (even as prices for those services continue to rise), Recruiter is presently being offered as a free upgrade to about eighty % of the 41.000 people who already subscribe to Recruiter globally (with the rest to arrive soon).

LinkedIn appears to have slowed down on its acquisition rush to construct out its wider capabilities — it’s been a year presently since the acquisition of Lynda for $1.5 billion — but it’s still trying to indicate investors that growth and diversification are coming. Just yesterday, the company launched its newest mobile app, LinkedIn Students, to capture more younger, university-aged users with a Tinder-like swiped interface that offers a low-pressure LinkedIn experience: some career and leadership essays, a few suggested jobs and tips on improving your profile are the highlights.

This is the company’s latest attempt to Ct younger users, which create up only around 22 percent of LinkedIn’s total user base, according to Pew. The Students app arrived at the same time that LinkedIn sunsetted most of its Learner portal, which was initially launched in two thousand-thirteenth and included lowering the minimum age for using the network to fourteen, along with college-finding tools and work tips, but clearly wasn’t getting sufficient interest or traction to hold updating it.

But the new Recruiter platform is about bring new users and continuing to invite existing ones to a platform that's not been updated to any significant extent since two thousand thirteen — a very long time, considering the many startups that have sprouted up hoping to muscle in on LinkedIn’s stronghold on this market, banked on its own database of hundreds of millions of professionals.

To link up with the company’s wider thrust to infuse the platform with more intelligence and predictive actions, the company is adding in a new look for feature to propose different work categories, locations, and skills, to better link up what you're looking for with what's in LinkedIn’s database:

The other fascinating area, resonant of a once-competing service called Connectifier that LinkedIn has presently acquired, is that LinkedIn presently gives you the option of looking for candidates across a wider pool by letting you discover potential people who share similar profile characteristics with people who you've already rated and decided are excellent (possibly even existing employees).

(And in case you were wondering, LinkedIn tells me that for presently it’s continuing to hold the Connectifier business as a standalone service and isn't merging its functionality with that of Recruiter. I don’t expect that to be the case for the long term, though: LinkedIn acquired Connectifier earlier this year, while it started to restore Recruiter latest year, and possibly even earlier, so may have been a case of being too late to attempt to turn the ship, so to speak.)

In addition to these two areas, some of the other areas that LinkedIn is also updating comprise new bright suggestions, which give those who aren't Boolean look for nerds the skill to select pre-selected filters, made up of the most common terms, to speed up how you discover things, which arrive up in a column on the left as buttons you can add or remove. After this you can also reorder your prospective hires base on how much they appeal.

 

 

Featured Image: jejim/Shutterstock

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