CRISPR creates a way out of regulation for GMO food

71
Source:   —  April 16, 2016, at 1:38 AM

The latest example is a white button mushroom genetically edited using CRISPR, or the skill to snip out and rearrange parts of an organism’s DNA.

CRISPR creates a way out of regulation for GMO food

Genetically modified crops are in the midst of a metamorphosis thanks to new gene-editing technology.

The latest example is a white button mushroom genetically edited using CRISPR, or the skill to snip out and rearrange parts of an organism’s DNA.

The U. S. Dept of Agriculture says it won’t regulate the mushroom because it doesn’t pose a possible threat like GMO plants using the DNA of foreign bacteria might.

A plant pathologist at Penn State, Dr. Yinong Yang, altered the mushroom’s DNA so it won’t brown when it comes in contact with oxygen; changing two letters in the code makes the fungus more resistant to browning.

But the Penn State scientist wasn’t sure if his genetically altered mushroom would necessity USDA clearance when he first created the modified species last October.

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is set up to defend America’s agricultural environment from problem plants — including crops altered through genetic engineering using donor DNA from bacteria or viruses to create plants more pest resistant.

But here’s where CRISPR presents a loophole for GMO — Dr. Yang didn’t add any foreign DNA to the mushroom. Instead, the tweak happened with the mushroom’s own genes.

CRISPR is a fairly new technology, breathing new life into the biotech field and clearly raising questions around regulation. Would the USDA consider crops with alterations of their own DNA problematic?

The mushroom is just one case out of thirty involving some form of gene-editing technique in the latest five years. But so distant the reply is no.

In a letter dated April 13 to Penn State, the USDA’s APHIS confirmed the mushroom is firmly planted exterior its scope.

“APHIS has number reason to believe that CRISPR/Cas9 white button mushrooms are plant pests. Therefore, consistent with previous responses to similar letters of inquiry, APHIS doesn't consider CRISPR/Cas9-edited white button mushrooms as described in your Oct 30, two thousand fifteen letter to be regulated pursuant to CFR seven part three hundred forty,” the USDA statement read.

Dr. Yang is presently mulling over the opportunity of starting a business around his mushrooms.

Featured Image: DarmstadtKoeln/Flickr BELOW A CC BY 2.0 LICENSE

READ ALSO
Live video viewing up eighty-six percent over latest year in MLB’s At Bat app, thanks to addition of multitasking

Live video viewing up eighty-six percent over latest year in MLB’s At Bat app, thanks to addition of multitasking

com At Bat application for iPad. Today, the organization is releasing some new numbers on what impact the introduction of split-screen viewing and picture-in-picture has on engagement and video viewing minutes in its application.

66
Apple tells NY judge FBI has ‘utterly failed&#eight thousand two hundred seventeen; to prove it needs assistance unlocking iPhones

Apple tells NY judge FBI has ‘utterly failed&#eight thousand two hundred seventeen; to prove it needs assistance unlocking iPhones

The ordinary fact that the feds  unlocked a phone without any assistance shows that they didn’t necessity it in the first place, Apple asserts: “The government has utterly failed to satisfy its burden to demonstrate that Apple’s assistance in this case is necessary.”...

81
Apple doesn’t consider government intrusion a primary iPhone security threat, yet

Apple doesn’t consider government intrusion a primary iPhone security threat, yet

Senior Apple engineers perceive that government intrusion isn't their primary threat model when designing iPhone security and said they instead prefer to focus on fending off hackers.

66
Claims of death threats emerge in disappearance of Wash. couple

Claims of death threats emerge in disappearance of Wash. couple

Police are treating the disappearance of 45-year-old Patrick Shunn and 46-year-old Monique Patenaude as "suspicious," because they declare it'south different for the couple to stay out of touch with family and friends for so long.

65