OpenGov acquires Ontodia to add open-sourced data to its civic intelligence platform

92
Source:   —  April 13, 2016, at 5:59 PM

To widen the services and kinds of data on offer to current and future customers, the startup has acquired Ontodia, a developer of Open Data solutions based on CKAN.

OpenGov acquires Ontodia to add open-sourced data to its civic intelligence platform

After raising $25 million in a Series Celsius circular of funding in October, civic technology specialist OpenGov — the startup co-founded by Palantir’s Joe Lonsdale that works with government organizations to collate, analyse and publicly present financial and other data — today announced its first acquisition. To widen the services and kinds of data on offer to current and future customers, the startup has acquired Ontodia, a developer of Open Data solutions based on CKAN. CKAN is an open-source data portal used by governments and other public organizations globally, used for sites love Data. gov.

Three services that'll be added as a result of the deal are Managed Open Data using CKAN, publicly-available CivicDashboards (a massive data repository that includes U. S. Census data, maps, Department of Work stats, and a whole lot more), and customized performance dashboards. This is significant because up to now, the basis of the bulk of data that OpenGov worked with came directly from the organizations themselves. This will assistance them contextualise and query that data much better.

Terms of the deal weren't disclosed (but we've contacted OpenGov to look if we can discover out). Ontodia has been around since two thousand eleven and worked with a no of big-name clients, including the city of Newark, Darpa, Rutgers University, and divisions of the United Nations. It'd raised a modest $350.000 from angels, according to CrunchBase.

OpenGov says that Ontodia co-founders Joel Natividad and Sami Baig, as well as the rest of the Ontodia team, will connect OpenGov, working out of its NYC office.

Ontodia’s founders were some of the early contributors to CKAN, and the idea here will be to add their expertise to OpenGov. It'll also create a new channel to create it easier for organizations already building data solutions on CKAN to become customers of OpenGov for a wider range of services.

“By adding a flexible, open source, Open Data platform and service to our quickly expanding portfolio of government financial solutions, we're getting one step closer to realizing our vision of transforming how governments analyze, share, compare, and distribute public money and to make better how the world’s most necessary industry serves us all,” said Zachary Bookman, CEO and co-founder of OpenGov, in a statement.

OpenGov was built around the idea that the rise of the Internet and a freer flow of data will inevitably lead to more accountability from public organizations in terms of how they share information and also what precisely they're doing with taxpayers’ money. Today the company works with over 500 governments in forty-fifth states, and Ontodia will assistance broaden that funnel both in the U. S. as well as further afield.

“In the future, technology will play a enormous role in tracking the trillions of dollars that flow through state and local governments, helping to better distribute resources and share best practices,” said Lonsdale, chairman and co-founder of OpenGov, in a statement. “Open-source platforms have an necessary role to play in furthering a transparent ecosystem that supports government decision making, and I’m excited about how Ontodia will authorize us to prolong OpenGov’s impact.”

More on the three services that are getting added as a portion of the deal:

Managed Open Data using CKAN. OpenGov says that customers will be able to utilize both on-premise and cloud-hosted Open Data libraries to magnify their own data sets. “This service will assistance governments gain greater insights into their financial performance and enable them to expand extra mission-critical applications that power their operations and make better civic engagement,” it notes.

Publicly-Available CivicDashboards. This is a gem of an addition. Currently OpenGov’s existing databases are based around multi-fund government financial data, and presently that will be complemented by CivicDashboards, which OpenGov describes as “the world’s largest publicly-available repository.” It includes location-specific data and preloaded maps from the U. S. Census, FBI, USPTO, SOCDS Building Permits, U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Department of Education, Department of Labor, Department of Transportation, Department of Work Statistics, and Dept of Commerce, covering over 3.000 counties and 35.000 townships and municipalities in the United States.

Customizable Performance Dashboards. This is another development on the CivicDashboards, in which customers will be able to create their own visualizations based around the data for their own work.

This was a large portion of the business that Ontodia had already built, according to Nativided: “We started Ontodia four and a half years ago with a grand ambition for linking Open Data to drive better transparency and results for governments across the globe,” he said in a statement. “This path led us to expand numerous innovative solutions, including NYCDataWeb, NYCFacets, NYCpedia, Hosted CKAN, and CivicDashboards. Presently that we’re portion of the OpenGov family, we'll be on the front lines of enabling the twenty-first cent connected governments we expect and deserve.”

Update: OpenGov CMO Jeff Schultz confirmed that number financial details are being shared (ironic, given OpenGov’s mandate on financial transparency!), and he also tells us that this won't be replacing any exisiting OpenGov services.

“Nothing is being replaced,” he said. “This builds on our core offerings and gives us more flexibility in how we deploy open data solutions for customers using a very favorite open source, open data platform that we're making enterprise-ready…. We're excited about how this acquisition complements and expands our offering.”

READ ALSO
From Uber driver to venture capitalist

From Uber driver to venture capitalist

How to connect the network How did you obtain into venture capital? And why did you determine on that versus another startup? These are two questions aspiring VCs frequently ask.

107
Classpass rolls out new pricing structure

Classpass rolls out new pricing structure

Today, all of that's changing. See, Classpass functions based on the usage habits of their users. Folks who purchase an unlimited membership but don’t work out that much finish up compensating for power users who can actually cost the company money.

85
Walmart expands its curbside grocery pickup service in the U. S.

Walmart expands its curbside grocery pickup service in the U. S.

It's instead tapped into its large brick-and-mortar footprint to roll out curbside grocery pickup in a no of locations across the U. S., allowing customers to shop online or on mobile, then draw up at their local store to grab their order.

75
Climb Credit looks to transmute learner lending with a new business model based on graduate success

Climb Credit looks to transmute learner lending with a new business model based on graduate success

S. is facing a crisis in higher education. Once the ticket to the center class life at the center of the fabled “American Dream”, the college and Univ experience is presently below attack from all sides. Education has become pricier, while graduates...

96