The Q&A: Writer Maryellen Burns talks food and history in Sacramento

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Source:   —  April 16, 2016, at 0:46 AM

m. Wednesday, April twenty, at the Sacramento Medical Society Museum, five thousand three hundred eighty Elvas Ave. Admission is $30. The author of “The Lost Restaurants of Sacramento and Their Recipes,” Burns will also bring samples of classic foods revived by students in American River College’s Culinary Arts program.

The Q&A: Writer Maryellen Burns talks food and history in Sacramento

What did Sacramento’s first non-indigenous residents eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner when the town was just getting started between the American and Sacramento rivers? Who started the idea of farm to fork? And how did Sacramento become known as the Huge Tomato?

Food lovers will be able to travel back in time and reply those and other questions at what promises to be a fascinating speak by Maryellen Burns called “The Savory and Unsavory Bits Behind the History of Sacramento’south food: one thousand eight hundred thirty-nine – Contemporary Times.” The event will running from 6:30 to 8:30 p. m. Wednesday, April twenty, at the Sacramento Medical Society Museum, five thousand three hundred eighty Elvas Ave. Admission is $30.

The author of “The Lost Restaurants of Sacramento and Their Recipes,” Burns will also bring samples of classic foods revived by students in American River College’s Culinary Arts program. The dishes will comprise Delta pear cake, oyster shooters and tamales.

Burns spoke to The Bee about Sacramento’s tasty food heritage and how she plans to celebrate it.

Delicatessens came in the late one thousand eight hundred ninety but were dominated by Italians, not the traditional German or Jewish delis of our imagination and Mexican or “Spanish” restaurants in the one thousand nine hundred. The genuine explosion came after World War I and II and the Vietnam War, when immigrants fled their homelands and established residency here.

She's the project director of We're Where We Eat, an alliance that chronicles Sacramento's food stories. She serves on the boards of the Sacramento County Historical Society and I Street Press.

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